Feeds

Holographic storage: We're going to do it this time. No, really

'Hey, it's no slower than watching a vid on CNN'

Mobile application security vulnerability report

Holo-disc start-up hVault, which slurped the blueprints for InPhase Technologies' holographic storage technology, has vowed to breathe life into the technology, with product promised for next year. Of course, we've already passed the spring of 2012, when hVault originally said it would be shipping the kit.

We hear noises from the the International Hologram Manufacturers Association (IHMA) that hVault has a 300GB, 50-year life product entering beta test by the end of 2012, with deliverable product by the summer of 2013. That's later than expected but what's new; the speed of light is 299,792,458 metres/sec, but the speed of holographic storage development is glacial.

InPhase struggled for years to productise its tapestry drive before crashing out and filing for chapter 11. Its holographic disks could store up to 300GB and last for 50-years or more. The discs won't need periodic re-writing to fresh media which, InPhase says, is necessary with tape, and so they are cheaper and more energy-efficient to store.

The slow access time for holographic disks is dealt with ingeniously by the InPhase team at hVault: "It is true that the access time for magnetic media is around a second or so and for holographic storage it can be up to 10 seconds but, when a user tries to access a CNN video link for example, a 10-second commercial fills interest until the content is accessed.

"With holographic storage media offering 100 times the capacity of magnetic media, there is really no competition. Large-scale storage used to be measured in terabytes but the industry is now demanding petabytes and exabytes and so systems containing up to 540 discs in a cabinet are going to become the norm."

The IHMA release mentions a cabinet containing up to 540 disks. At 300GB/disk that would be 162TB. There's still a way to go to get to petabytes and exabytes. ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
THUD! WD plonks down SIX TERABYTE 'consumer NAS' fatboy
Now that's a LOT of porn or pirated movies. Or, you know, other consumer stuff
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
FLAPE – the next BIG THING in storage
Find cold data with flash, transmit it from tape
Seagate chances ARM with NAS boxes for the SOHO crowd
There's an Atom-powered offering, too
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.