Feeds

Japanese boffins plumb darknet for cyber attack alerts

DAEDALUS system monitors unused IP addresses

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Japanese boffins at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) have been showing off a new real-time alert system designed to help security teams spot and visualise cyber attacks more effectively.

The DAEDALUS (Direct Alert Environment for Darknet And Livenet Unified Security) system has been in the making for several years, and detects threats via large-scale monitoring of the internet’s unused IP addresses, which NICT calls the ‘darknet’.

Here’s an explanation from a 2009 research paper:

We propose a novel application of large-scale darknet monitoring that significantly contributes to the security of live networks. In contrast to the conventional method, wherein the packets received from the outside are observed, we employ a large-scale distributed darknet that consists of several organisations that mutually observe the malicious packets transmitted from the inside of the organisations. Based on this approach, we have developed an alert system called DAEDALUS.

DAEDALUS is able to alert security teams when an active IP address in the organisation is trying to send packets to an unused IP address on the darknet – a sure sign that a virus is beginning to spread internally.

The real whizz-bangery is in the 3-D user interface which represents this data.

Users are presented with a giant blue globe at the centre of the screen representing the internet, with a series of circles suspended around it in orbit – these are the networks under observation, as pictured below.

NICT's Daedelus security scanner

Each circle displays in blue the proportion of the network containing active IP addresses and in black those that are not used.

Alerts are also displayed and can be clicked through to present more information, for example on which IP address they are spreading from, the time and type of threat.

NICT currently monitors 190,000 IP addresses in Japan but the potential for use internationally is obvious.

The technology will be made available for free to Japanese universities, but local tech firm Clwit is the big winner as it will reportedly be given commercial access to the tool to wrap into a new product dubbed SiteVisor.

Check out the video courtesy of Japanese tech site DigInfo. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
SMASH the Bash bug! Apple and Red Hat scramble for patch batches
'Applying multiple security updates is extremely difficult'
Shellshock: 'Larger scale attack' on its way, warn securo-bods
Not just web servers under threat - though TENS of THOUSANDS have been hit
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
Hackers thrash Bash Shellshock bug: World races to cover hole
Update your gear now to avoid early attacks hitting the web
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Who.is does the Harlem Shake
Blame it on LOLing XSS terroristas
Researchers tell black hats: 'YOU'RE SOOO PREDICTABLE'
Want to register that domain? We're way ahead of you.
Stunned by Shellshock Bash bug? Patch all you can – or be punished
UK data watchdog rolls up its sleeves, polishes truncheon
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.