Feeds

China goes Alt with root proposal

Because the DNS doesn’t scale … no, really

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

China Telecom has only our best interests at heart, which is why it’s proposing that a Balkanised DNS system would save us from the disastrous effects of failure to scale.

It’s been a long time – a long, long time – since this author has written up an IETF RFC that wasn’t dated April 1, but it’s time to make an exception, for this draft, “DNS extension for autonomous Internet”.

Apparently, the authors believe that an independent root server is necessary to “achieve the goal of Internet autonomy” – which will probably appear to those inclined to negative connotations as if China wants to ‘draft’ the IETF into helping it perfect its firewall.

The proposal is for an autonomous Internet to have “its own independent domain name resolution hierarchy and root DNS servers” (which calls to mind the old ‘alt root’ wars of days gone by). As far as El Reg can untangle the nearly-lethal combination of jargon and translation, the new hierarchy would work like this: if “yahoo” is present in network A (say, China), then www.yahoo.com would work as it does now. If not, then reachability would depend on whether Network B (where yahoo.com is) is mapped into Network A; if so, it would resolve as www.yahoo.com.B.

If El Reg were given to such wild speculation, we might also suggest an element of nationalism in the proposal. Today, a country-level domain such as .au or .cz refers back to the root DNS; under the China Telecom proposal, .cz would refer to its own local root file, as would other autonomous zones (.com would refer to a different root than .cz, in other words). These distributed roots, existing in a peer relationship, would then resolve names existing in each others’ hierarchy.

Or perhaps, to indulge an even wilder and more-improbable speculation, the whole thing is a lobbying position ahead of this year’s ITU meeting, at which the rest of the world seems hell-bent on destroying the Internet by wresting control away from the US. Or something … ®

Bootnote: A hat-tip to Mark Newton, on Twitter @NewtonMark, whose tweet alerted El Reg to this story. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Broadband sellers in the UK are UP TO no good, says Which?
Speedy network claims only apply to 10% of customers
Virgin Media struck dumb by NATIONWIDE packet loss balls-up
Turning it off and on again fixes glitch 12 HOURS LATER
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence
Download Choosing a Cloud Hosting Provider with Confidence to learn more about cloud computing - the new opportunities and new security challenges.