Feeds

For FORK'S sake: GitHub checks out Windows client

The rise and rise of Torvalds' tool

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Open ... and Shut Just two years ago, Git barely eked out a mention in Forrester's analysis of the software configuration management (or source code management) market, despite a clear trend toward open-source SCM tools. Now Git owns 27.6 per cent of the SCM market, according to a recent Eclipse Foundation survey, with Subversion apparently in terminal decline. Git's success, long driven by its embrace of the open-source ethos of forking, is now set to hit overdrive as it has broadened its appeal beyond command-line-loving elites to Windows developers.

In other words, for those who pooh-poohed the rise of Git and GitHub, it's time to wake up.

Git has been on a torrid growth spurt. In this same survey Git collected 6.8 per cent of the SCM market in 2010 and ramped to 12.8 per cent in 2011. Some Subversion or IBM Rational devotees have attempted to explain away Git's rise as an open-source hobbyist phenomenon. But at 27 per cent market share, that claim is no longer credible.

Which isn't to say that GitHub, the most popular host for Git, couldn't do more to appeal to enterprise developers. And so last week the company announced that it is releasing a Windows app to make Git easy for Windows developers. As GitHub co-founder Chris Wanstrath notes, enterprise developers "want to use GitHub, but they’re having a hard time doing so".

Enter GitHub for Windows.

It's arguably one of the key components that has been missing from GitHub's arsenal: a Windows-friendly way to tap into the power of Git. As much as Git has been the SCM tool of choice for elite developers, it has also caused no shortage of ill-will from developers who feel they've been bullied into using it. Git gets high marks for its commitment to the cardinal rule of open source: the right to fork. It gets low marks for ease of use and polish. GitHub has made Git significantly easier to use, as Git creator Linus Torvalds has said, but there's still a lot of work to do.

By embracing Windows GitHub may have gone a long way toward getting that work done. No more command line. Enter the graphical user interface. Windows love everywhere.

Given that 56 per cent of Microsoft Azure's open-source cloud projects are already hosted on GitHub, according to new Black Duck research, there's clearly an overlap between Microsoft's world and GitHub. Arguably this move by GitHub will only enhance it, taking GitHub even deeper into the enterprise.

GitHub took off because it makes code forking so easy, as Sean Kerner, senior editor for InternetNews.com, pointed out to me on Twitter. This has made GitHub a hugely strategic web property, given its central role in aggregating developers, and has put the company in a position to turn a profit on millions of dollars in revenue each year, and earn the interest of and cash from one of the industry's premier venture capitalists.

Now it's time for GitHub to become easy to use, and thereby attract a new breed of enterprise developer. It's an exceptionally smart move by an impressive company. It may well lead to another 100 per cent boost in SCM market share by 2013. One would be foolish to bet against it. ®

Matt Asay is senior vice president of business development at Nodeable, offering systems management for managing and analysing cloud-based data. He was formerly SVP of biz dev at HTML5 start-up Strobe and chief operating officer of Ubuntu commercial operation Canonical. With more than a decade spent in open source, Asay served as Alfresco's general manager for the Americas and vice president of business development, and he helped put Novell on its open source track. Asay is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI). His column, Open...and Shut, appears three times a week on The Register.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
Was ist das? Eine neue Suse Linux Enterprise? Ausgezeichnet!
Version 12 first major-number Suse release since 2009
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.