Feeds

ISPs say AWS listed by Australian peering services

Source says co-located data centre testing under way

High performance access to file storage

Amazon Web Services (AWS) is close to turning on an Australian facility, The Register has been told by a provider of IP networking services.

A staffer at the company, who asked not to be identified, added that AWS intends to offer cloud computing, as distinct from cloud storage and other AWS services. The computing service will not be served from an Amazon facility, as the company has chosen to co-locate in an existing third-party data centre in Australia.

The IP networking company's staffer told The Reg it has been approached to provide peering services.

Adding credence to that account is a similar report from a worker at an Australian ISP, who told The Reg that network operator Pipe is already providing peering services for AWS. The ISP's staffer said a management console Pipe provides to its customers last week listed AWS among customers for whom it provides peering in New South Wales. A staffer at a second IP reports traffic flowing over the link.

Pipe’s and Equinix's Sydney operations can already be identified as peers for AWS, through sources like Robtex.

While the evidence above offers more proof of AWS' intention to create a local data centre, which have previously been inferred by job ads, it is not yet utterly conclusive evidence of an Australian AWS presence. Peering exchanges are used by big internet traffic generators to ensure their data flows efficiently between network operators, instead of being forced on long, latency-inducing, routes. But as Paul Brooks of networking consultancy Layer10 told The Register, peering could be a way for AWS to speed traffic flows to offshore data centres.

We're therefore not entirely certain the involvement of Australian peers is a smoking gun for a local AWS presence, although given the job ads for data centre and infrastructure experts ran months ago it is hard not to imagine the cloudy company hasn’t cooked up something on Australian shores.

AWS is certainly vigorous here: the company staged a summit in Sydney and Melbourne last month. Customers who spoke at the Sydney event included Vodafone and News Limited and the latter said it has replaced its entire test and development platform with AWS and is considering wider use of the company's cloud services, possibly as a platform on which to host online properties. The former said it is contemplating a cloud-based CMS for all its content, after using AWS to power a live cricket broadcasting app.

Both applications are, we feel it is fair to say, latency-sensitive and could therefore benefit from a local AWS facility. But they’re not quite so sensitive that they would need the extraordinary security that AWS provides for its own data centres, which could explain the co-location option.

If it is indeed the case that Amazon will co-locate its first Australian presence, it is therefore hard to imagine governments stampeding towards the web services giant. But even if that is the case, AWS would be ahead of Microsoft and Google, both of which rely on offshore data centres. Local cloud providers would also be fearful: few can match the range of services AWS provides. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Seagate brings out 6TB HDD, did not need NO STEENKIN' SHINGLES
Or helium filling either, according to reports
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.