Feeds

Linux Mint joins mini-PC hardware business

Smooth and ribbed minty boxes for your pleasure

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Linux Mint, flush with its recent popularity in the distro stakes, is looking to take the pain out of installation with its first hardware line, called mintBox, that comes in smooth and ribbed versions.

"We're passionate about what we do and for our very first Mint device, we wanted something unique, something special and extraordinary. The mintBox is Mint in a box. It's tiny, it's silent, it's extremely versatile and it comes packed with connectivity," said the group in a blog post.

mintBox

Smooth or ribbed for extra power (click to enlarge)

The dual-antenna boxes come in a $476 basic model with an AMD 1.0 GHz G-T40N processor, 250 GB of disk storage and 4GB of RAM, or buyers can double the RAM and get a 1.65 GHz G-T56N chip for the $549 Pro model. Both mintBoxes use fan-free metal cases, with the Pro version's being ribbed for extra heat dissipation.

Each system has an HDMI port and a DVI adapter, with eight USB slots (two of which are USB 3.0), an RS232 port, and two eSATA sockets, along with Gigabit Ethernet. Bluetooth is built-in, as is 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi.

mintbox size

For those who like their high-tech titchy

Open source enthusiasts, who are almost by definition interested in fiddling about in the guts of technology, will be happy to know that the memory and hard drive are positioned to allow easy replacement, including with SSD kit. While the processor isn't upgradable, there's no doubt plenty of overclocking can be done if heat issues can be sorted.

Linux Mint is pitching the devices at corporates, the education sector, and internet cafes. It's also not the only company eyeing those markets – Google and Samsung announced a Chrome OS box going for the same dollar last month.

Of course, Linux Mint isn't making the boxes themselves. Production has been outsourced to Israeli manufacturer CompuLab, which is using the fit-PC3 model and preloading Linux Mint 13 Cinnamon, with version 12 with MATE 1.2 and XBMC also available. Of the sales price, 10 per cent goes to Linux Mint. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Samsung Gear S: Quick, LAUNCH IT – before Apple straps on iWatch
Full specs for wrist-mounted device here ... but who'll buy it?
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
Reg man looks through a Glass, darkly: Google's toy ploy or killer tech specs?
Tip: Put the shades on and you'll look less of a spanner
HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE
Noo! Hand not big enough! Don't look at meee!
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
Tim Cook in Applerexia fears: New MacBook THINNER THAN EVER
'Supply chain sources' give up the goss on new iLappy
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.