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Asus-made Google pad set for June debut

All eyes on Google I/O

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An Asus staffer has let slip that the Taiwanese tablet maker is indeed working on a seven-incher for Google and that the gadget will be announced at the end of the month.

The Android 4.1 standard bearer seems set, then, to be unveiled at Google I/O, the online advertising giant's annual technology conference, says Android Authority, into whose ear the Asus rep whispered during the Computex show last week.

Such a device has already been spied on benchmark sites whose readouts appear to confirm the so-called Nexus 7 will use Nvidia's Tegra 3 chip running at 1.3GHz and driving a 1280 x 768 screen.

Originally expected by the end of Q2, the tablet now looks set to ship in July, other moles from Taiwan's component manufactuerer community have said in the past. That would certainly tally with a late June unveiling.

Other whispers have it that the Nexus 7 will be priced at $199 to take the fight straight to Amazon's Kindle Fire as much as Apple's market-leading iPad. ®

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