Feeds

'Unnamed' HP biz unit developing mystery object storage

Secret's in the COS service source

3 Big data security analytics techniques

HP is developing an object storage product, basing it on technology used in its Cloud Object Storage service.

Object storage is designed for storing massive amounts of unstructured information in a highly scalable, scale-out infrastructure of linked nodes with a flat object address space instead of in a file:folder system with nested folders.

A piece of digital information, such as a mail message, image or other file, has a hashing-type mathematical algorithm applied to its contents and the resulting unique number is used to locate it in an address space, with another algorithm used for specifying which node in the object storage hardware set will store it. Other algorithms are used to provide object and node protection.

Suppliers of object storage include Amplidata; Caringo, which is used by Dell; EMC – with Atmos and Centera; NetApp, with Bycast; Object Matrix; and Scality, among others. But until now, not HP.

HP offers a Cloud Object Storage service, based in its own data centres, which uses its Converged Infrastructure products with server, storage and networking components and OpenStack Swift APIs and software. The service provides customers with scalable online storage capacity on-demand.

HP says it's good for archiving and backup, serving static content for web applications, and storing "large public or private data sets, such as online files and media", whatever that means.

A Cloud Object Storage FAQ states: "Objects loaded into HP Cloud Object Storage are replicated numerous times and then stored in multiple availability zones for redundancy and to ensure availability in the unlikely event of a failure.

"Additionally, data uploaded and downloaded are encrypted in-transit, and HP’s data centres are protected with state of the art security systems. For particularly sensitive data, you may choose to encrypt data prior to storing as well."

At HP Discover in Las Vegas this week we learned that the company plans to offer an on-premise version of this, also built on OpenStack. Shelton Shugar, HP's VP for enterprise cloud services, said: "I believe it's something we are looking at." There is a roadmap plan.

We asked David Scott, the head of HP storage, if IBRIX scale-out filer software is involved. He said he couldn't say anything about it and the effort is being driven by an unnamed HP business unit.

We asked another HP staffer what HP hardware and software would be used and were told that the various data centre implementations of the Cloud Object Service have different hardware and base software components. There is no one single HP object storage HW/SW stack, oddly. It's all very hush-hush and trying to get information about it was like pushing jelly uphill.

We have no timescale for the mysterious object storage product but anticipate it should appear within 12 months. Our feelers are out and we're hunting down more information. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.