Feeds

Apple-Moto patent gripe almost thrown out the door

US judge 'tentatively' dismisses IP lawsuit

New hybrid storage solutions

A US judge has finally gotten as sick of patent cases as the rest of the world and all but thrown out an Apple v Motorola Mobility lawsuit.

Judge Richard Posner has issued a tentative view that the case should be dismissed with prejudice, which would mean that neither of the companies could bring up their whinges again, and cancelled the beginning of the trial.

The "tentative" bit is legalese for the judge not being quite sure yet, but at the moment he reckons that neither of the warring firms have enough evidence to get any damages off each other and that's enough to stop the trial from starting.

He said that he would decide for definite within a week, when he would issue his full opinion, but he warned that he could still change his mind and allow the trial to go ahead.

Both the fruity firm and the now-Google-owned mobile maker were looking for injunctions as well, but Posner said that bans were out of the question.

"Injunctive relieve would impose costs disproportionate to the harm to the patentee and the benefit of the alleged infringement to the alleged infringer and would be contrary to the public interest," he said. "I cannot find a basis for an award of injunctive relief."

Despite the myriad battles between Apple and companies that use Android in their phones (so really against Google), this case had been whittled down already to just two patents on Apple's side and one infringement alleged by Motorola.

Tech lovers everywhere will be hoping that this is the beginning of the end for the Great Patent Wars, so that smartphone-makers can go back to making cool products, while Google is no doubt happy to avoid what would have been the first direct confrontation with the fruity firm since its acquisition of Motorola closed.

But Apple is perhaps not so pleased, since it was fighting to the end to get something out of the case. Judge Posner said that the iPhone-maker had urged him to hold a full evidentiary hearing on its attempt to get a ban at the last minute – at the end of the hearing yesterday afternoon.

The judge also said that Apple wanted declaratory relief, where he would assign rights and duties concerning the patents to the two firms, if no injunction was forthcoming.

Neither Google nor Apple had returned a request for comment at the time of publication. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
Former Bitcoin Foundation chair pleads guilty to money-laundering charge
Charlie Shrem plea deal could still get him five YEARS in chokey
NORKS ban Wi-Fi and satellite internet at embassies
Crackdown on tardy diplomatic sysadmins providing accidental unfiltered internet access
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.