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Last.fm tell users to change passwords IMMEDIATELY

Jumps before the Pastebin post

Last.fm users are the latest internet community to get the “change your password” message as the music streaming site investigates a “leak of some user passwords”.

However, unlike LinkedIn or eHarmony, Last.fm has jumped on the suspicion that something’s wrong, rather than waiting for user passwords to appear on the Internet. In this post, the service tells all users to change their passwords.

"We're sorry for the inconvenience around changing your password; Last.fm takes your privacy very seriously," the company said.

Further updates will be made available on Twitter "as we get to the bottom of this", Last.fm added.

On its Naked Security blog, Sophos notes that Last.fm is giving the same advice to all users at login.

The service also emphasises that it will not ask for passwords or send direct links to users’ settings in emails.

Password-reset frenzy

This follows recent hack attacks on business networking platform LinkedIn and dating site eHarmony, where user passwords were published online.

LinkedIn users are now suffering a spam deluge following the attack, including phishing messages directing users to fake password-reset links.

In the case of LinkedIn, a Russian hacker posted 6.5 million users passwords on a Russian Dropbox-type site and users have since complained of being swamped by spam emails.

As for eHarmony, around 1.5 million users passwords were stolen and published.

The Register is also receiving reports from eHarmony users that the spam messages are arriving, indicating that the attackers have accessed user IDs as well as the password file.

One user has told The Register the spam has arrived to an email account, only used for eHarmony, that “remained spam-free until the last 36 hours”.

“Not surprisingly, eHarmony haven't answered my requests for more information,” the user told us. ®

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