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Sharp to show OLED 'retina' display for laptops

3840 x 2160 screen, anyone?

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Fancy a 3840 x 2160 display in your next 13in laptop? Form an orderly queue outside Sharp's offices then, and loudly demand it turns its latest prototype panel into shipping product.

The 13.5in screen contains just under 8.3 million white OLED pixels filtered for RGB colour. Its dimensions yield a pixel density of 326 pixels per inch - just what the iPhone 4S' "retina" display currently offers.

Since a laptop screen typically sits further away from your eyeballs than a smartphone display, the Sharp screen, which uses the company's IGZO (Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide) thin-film transistor tech, is more than capable of presenting pixels too small to be distinguished one from the other.

Speaking of mobile devices, Sharp will next week be showing off a 6.1in IGZO LCD for handsets or small tablets that has a pixel density of 498ppi. The resolution is 2560 x 1600.

Sharp will be demo'ing the screens at the annual Society for Information Display (SID) shindig. It will also be showing a 326ppi, 540 x 960 bendy 3.4in OLED and a 5in 720p LCD for smartphones. ®

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