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Google's 7in Jelly Bean Android tablet spied in benchmark

Asus made, Nvidia inside

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Google's Asus-made 7in tablet has turned up in web-posted benchmark results. It's running Android 4.1.

Rightware's Powerboard benchmark ties into an online database Android fans can use to compare kit performance. Fansite Android Police spotted a listing for the "Google Asus Nexus 7", an Nvidia Tegra 3-based tablet running at 1.3GHz.

It has a screen resolution of 1280 x 768 if you needed a further indication that this is a 7in boy.

Powerboard Nexus 7 report

Further info: the Nexus 7 is codenamed 'Grouper' and that Android 4.1 reference and its build number, JRN51B - Jelly Bean, in other words.

It could, of course, be a fake. The data confirms much of what has leaked out about Google's tablet plans - its emphasis on the low end, hence 7in; its partnership with Asus; a Q2-Q3 introduction - but then that information could just as easily have been used to fool the benchmark result filing system.

Still, with the device now expected to appear in June, final testing and benchmarking could plausibly be exposed in a benchmark. ®

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