Feeds

Amazon lets you barf VMs out of EC2

What sucks can also blow

High performance access to file storage

If you want to be the public cloud of choice, as Amazon Web Services most certainly does, then you need to have a rich set of tools that allows companies to take virtual server instances running inside their data centers and suck them onto the EC2 cloud and link them into S3 or EBS storage.

But you also need to be able to let companies pull virtual machine images off the EC2 cloud and let them run locally inside the corporate firewall. Not that companies will necessarily do this, but they need to know that they can do this.

Amazon has offered a the AWS VM Import service as part of EC2 for quite some time now, and for free, and has now rounded it out with a VM Export service. So the cloud is a two-way street again.

The import/export functions are part of the EC2 API Tools. The import tool allows virtual machines stored in VMware's VMDK format for its ESXi hypervisor, the VHD format used by Microsoft with its Hyper-V and Citrix Systems with its XenServer hypervisors, or RAW file format used by Red Hat's KVM hypervisor to be pulled into the EC2 cloud and converted to its native Amazon Machine Image (AMI) format.

The new export function can only expel VMs from the Amazon cloud in VMDK or VHD formats aimed at their respective ESXi and Hyper-V or XenServer formats. And according to a post by Jeff Barr, evangelist at the AWS unit, that export only works for Windows Server 2003 R2 and Windows Server 2008 EC2 instances at the moment. Amazon is looking for input on the matrix of VM formats and operating systems it should support with the export service. So give Barr an earful, especially about not support Linux from the get-go.

One last thing: While the import and export function is free, the storage that you use on S3 to hold the exported VM image is not. So you will need to pay for S3 storage to do your exporting. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.