Feeds

Police cuff hundreds in £7.3 MILLION phone scam

Two plane-loads of crooks flown to China, amid suspicions of high-level Police corruption

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Police across South East Asia have swooped on an international telephone fraud gang, arresting over 480 people in eight countries after an investigation lasting six months.

The alleged gang members, most of whom are Chinese and Taiwanese, are suspected of conning their victims out of 73 million yuan (£7.3m), according to a Xinhua report.

Although all 510 suspected cases of fraud took place on the Chinese mainland, the suspects were rounded up nations around the region - Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Fiji, China and Taiwan – and are said to have established money-laundering operations in Taiwan and Thailand.

Given the size of the group, two chartered planes were needed to fly the Chinese suspects back from Thailand and Malaysia to Beijing on Thursday, while separate planes were needed to transport the Taiwanese members back to their home country to be prosecuted.

China’s Ministry of Public Security led the investigation, which saw six groups of officers sent around the region earlier this month.

Liu Ancheng, Deputy Director of the ministry's Criminal Investigation Bureau, is quoted as saying that the case was unusual for mainland crime because of the large numbers of Taiwanese involved.

"The group mainly squeezed money from individuals or companies by calling them in the name of police or procuratorate staff and threatening to accuse them of money-laundering crimes," he reportedly added.

“Ringleaders from Taiwan were deterred by mainland police's stern crackdown on telecom scams, so they recruited locals in Taiwan to commit this crime.”

Cynical observers may suggest that the criminals’ modus operandi worked so well because of the high level of police corruption in China, which made their phone calls appear credible.

Phone fraud is on the rise in Asia, particularly in Japan where the elderly are often targeted. In fact, the problem is so bad there that Fujitsu recently unveiled technology designed to alert users when they are being scammed. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.