Feeds

Amazon offers cloudy app test drives

Casting Android handsets as very thin clients

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Amazon is extending its cloud-based Test Drive to its on-device store, offering browsers a quick shot at an Android app, on their own phone, as a prelude to closing the sale.

The service doesn't require developers to do anything, it just pops up as an option in the application's details (assuming you are in the USA), allowing the user to run the application in Amazon's cloud to see if they like it before buying, downloading and installing locally.

Amazon test drive button

No sign of Test Drive, or the Amazon store itself, on this side of the pond though

Applications running in the cloud can't access all local resources: the Amazon App Store sandbox will permit access to the touch screen and accelerometer but apps requiring access to GPS, camera, microphone or even multi-touch can't be run remotely, so buyers will just have to take the plunge and down-rate things they don't like.

Amazon promises to extend the sandbox over time, linking up to more local features, perhaps (over time) reducing the dependence on local processing and shifting mobile applications completely into Amazon's cloud.

The patchy connectivity inherent in mobility will postpone that for a while, but for giving a game a quick test-run the cloud works fine, and gives Amazon the chance to test out how a cloud-based future would work. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.