Feeds

New Oyster online service goes live at TfL

Allows travellers to check the damage online

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Transport for London (TfL) has launched an online service for Oyster card holders, which allows them to look back over their journey history and fares paid.

London's transport authority hopes that the online account will allow season ticket or pay-as-you-go users to easily check that they have been correctly charged for their journeys without having to contact the call centre. Passengers who register for the new system will also be able to see whether they have correctly touched in and out of card readers at stations.

The system aims to make the process for printing out the journey history on an Oyster card easier as passengers will be able to download their history online and use the information to claim work expenses, rather than having to contact the Oyster help desk for the information to be posted to them. Eight weeks of journey history will be available, from the date the Oyster account is set up, the transport authority said.

According to TfL, feedback from customers who have trialled the accounts has been positive so far.

The new move is part of a programme of improvements to make the Oyster system more convenient for passengers and to streamline processes for the authority. More features will be introduced to the Oyster online accounts system later this year, including the ability to submit refund applications online.

Shashi Verma, TfL's director of customer experience, said the authority understood the frustration felt by some customers who have had issues with the current system.

"Having the online account allows users to easily check that they have been correctly charged without having to contact a call centre. Later this year we will further improve the service by introducing an online refund service, which will be another step forward for our hugely popular cards," she said.

The announcement to enhance the Oyster system is happening alongside a drive by the authority to launch contactless payments later this year. However, in November last year the business case for contactless tickets was heavily criticised by the London assembly's transport committee for not being robust enough. TfL was told to report back to the committee by September 2012 on the concerns it had raised.

Speaking at a transport event in January, Matthew Hudson, head of business development for fares and ticketing at the authority, said that TfL was committed to launching contactless tickets. He also revealed that the Oyster system was at times problematic and expensive to run, but said that the authority had no plans to phase out the smartcard.

This article was originally published at Guardian Government Computing.

Guardian Government Computing is a business division of Guardian Professional, and covers the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. For updates on public sector IT, join the Government Computing Network here.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Sway: Microsoft's new Office app doesn't have an Undo function
Content aggregation, meet the workplace ... oh
Sign off my IT project or I’ll PHONE your MUM
Honestly, it’s a piece of piss
Return of the Jedi – Apache reclaims web server crown
.london, .hamburg and .公司 - that's .com in Chinese - storm the web server charts
NetWare sales revive in China thanks to that man Snowden
If it ain't Microsoft, it's in fashion behind the Great Firewall
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.