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Apple will start selling fondleslabs in the Chinese cities where they are made, a job advert reveals.

A job posting for "Store Leaders" on the Hong Kong branch of JobsDB reveals that Apple is looking to set up Apple stores in the southern Chinese cities of Shenzen and Chengdu, where Apple assemblers Foxconn and Pegatron have huge factories.

Apple has identified China as a huge growth opportunity – Tim Cook called sales there "amazing" and identified it as "our fastest growing major region by far" – but only has five stores there: two in Beijing and three in Shanghai, compared to over 100 in America.

There was a riot outside the Beijing Sanlitun store in January because the store was unable to open on the launch of the iPhone 4S, due to huge queues.

In the job advert picked up by Apple Insider and posted on 8 May, Apple said it was recruiting "Store Leaders" in Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu and Shenzen.

Apple Asia is looking for a "genuinely inspiring leader" who has to be a graduate with five years of experience. The job is described as: "A chance to use your hands and heart." ®

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