Feeds

Indian government to buy in tech for social good

Acquisition fund could start on farming tech next year

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The Indian government has revealed ambitious plans to set-up a Technology Acquisition Fund designed to facilitate the purchase of technologies from across the globe in order that they may be modified and commercialised domestically to benefit the whole of Indian society.

Renu Swarup, an advisor to the country’s science and technology ministry, told local news agency the Press Trust of India (PTI) during a trip to the US that the fund would probably launch next year.

"The purpose is to buy and acquire technologies either nationally or globally. And these would be technologies for public good,” she said.

“Wherever there is technology which is already available, having affordable product development, we do not really need to reinvent the wheel, bring in those technologies and these would be then bought by the government and made available to a consortium of industries.”

Shipping in fully-formed technologies would be more cost-effective in many cases than having home-grown scientists work on developing products and services with similar capabilities, she reportedly argued.

“At the moment we do not even have a database of the available technologies. We haven't done sufficient technology mapping at the moment,” Swarup told the PTI.

“Once we do that mapping, only then we can actually take a decision on what this technology fund would be or what its size would be. We haven't earmarked any specific budget as of now."

Like China, India has one of the fastest growing economies in the world, driven by a massive population and a growing middle class.

However, huge social and economic inequalities remain in the sub-continent. The most recent national census poll, for example, found that more Indian households have a mobile phone than an indoor toilet.

The same poll reported that around a third of households are still lit by kerosene lamps and nearly half have mud floors.

If established, the acquisition fund is likely to put at least some of its focus on developing technology in the agricultural sector, the report suggested. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.