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iCloud blows away 15 million users for 90 minutes

Normal service has been restored, photo-sharing on the way

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Apple’s iCloud service crashed for ninety minutes on Monday, US time, leaving 12% of users – about 15 million people - possibly “unable to access iCloud mail.”

Apple issued a system status update confirming the outage, which took place from 8:00AM to 9:30AM, Pacific Daylight time.

The reason for the outage is not known, but it’s tempting to link the disruption to a Wall Street Journal report that says Apple’s World Wide Developer Conference will see iCloud precipitate a new photo-sharing feature. The report suggests the service will operate a lot like Instagram and other similar services, in that it will allow users to upload photos and make them visible to other iCloud users who will be able to comment on each image.

It may also become possible to use iCloud as a video sharing service, while speculation also suggests an enhanced calendaring service may be added to the nubilous service soon. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

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