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Facebook tests paid post promotion

“Make sure friends see this” by handing over cash

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Facebook has been spotted trialling a service that allows users to pay a small fee, said to be US$2 dollars, to highlight posts to “Make sure friends see this.”

New Zealand website Stuff.co.nz learned of the feature, pictured below, and extracted a confirmation from a Facebook spokesfriend to the effect that the feature is being tested on a select group of users.

Smiley face

The test of the feature is notable, given the social network’s looming IPO and associated raised eyebrows that it is not making an awful lot of money given the colossal size of its member base.

Those hordes will also soon get the chance to share files among themselves. A slew of reports suggest group members will be offered the chance to upload items up to 25 megabytes in size. That’s no DropBox-killer, but probably isn’t welcome news for the growing cloud storage and synchronisation crowd either. ®

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