Feeds

Kiwi ISP offers geo-block workaround

No more “second-grade-third-world-digital-boat-people people”

Security for virtualized datacentres

A newly-launched New Zealand ISP, FYX, promises to try and avoid geo-blocking regimes that restrict access to certain content to residents of a select group of nations.

Geoblocking is particularly annoying in nations beyond Europe and North America, as smaller market sizes and lower profit potential mean content producers make online services a low priority.

A subsidiary of the more staid ISP Maxnet, FYX’s pitch is that Kiwis don't deserve that treatment:

“We all know that New Zealand is the best little country in the world. But sometimes being little means that we get passed over when toys are being handed out by the international gods-of-cool-and-fun.

There is a bunch of stuff on the internet that a few of us didn't have the freedom to access (without stealing it, and we aren't into that). So we decided to FYX the internet by removing some of the barriers that were getting in the way of great choice.”

The company characterises Internet users deprived of its Global Mode as “second-grade-third-world-digital-boat-people” and suggests that customers may be able to “ … start saving a lot of money by getting rid of some other monthly services that may become irrelevant to you”.

All of which sounds very nice, but FYX's FAQs reveal the promise of Global Mode may go unfulfilled, as:

“Global Mode does not guarantee access to any particular or specific websites or content, but works to improve the overall accessibility of content from around the world.”

FYX is also pretty careful to ensure that it does not become a target for Big Content, telling would-be customers that “Many websites, whether available because of Global Mode or not require you to agree to terms and conditions before you start using its service. Global Mode does not negate you from these responsibilities or act on your behalf.”

New Zealand’s National Business Review quotes local lawyer Justin Graham as saying the service is consistent with spirit of New Zealand consumer laws’ aims of providing open access to competitive services.

Whether that stance, and FYX’s disclaimers keep Big Content off the new ISP’s back remains to be seen. But we suspect Sysadmins at sites using geo-blocking are already pulling out the notes they used to block VPN services that offered workarounds similar to Global Mode. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.