Feeds

Scandal ad slingers cough up $100k in 'Facebook clickjack' case

Marketing biz 'earning $1.2m a month' settles out of court

3 Big data security analytics techniques

A marketing firm accused of running campaigns via a web of unscrupulous affiliates – who flooded Facebook with spam – has agreed to clean up its network. The business's owners settled a lawsuit brought against them and have denied any wrongdoing.

Delaware-based Adscend Media allegedly made $1.2m (£743k) per month1 from messages supposedly offering "scandalous or provocative content".

In reality the attached links often led towards sites that coaxed punters into handing over personal information as part of "online surveys" which then failed to dish the promised dirt.

These polls were allegedly also promoted by the use of "likejacking" in which Facebook users were tricked into clicking on "like" buttons, inadvertently punting sales pitches at their friends.

The allegations prompted a lawsuit by the Washington State Attorney General's Office against Adscend and its co-owners – Jeremy Bash of Huntington, West Virginia and Fehzan Ali, of Austin, Texas – in January.

The defendants settled the case this week by paying $100,000 (£61k) in attorneys’ costs and fees and agreeing to an injunction prohibiting unethical marketing behaviour - the court decree is here [PDF]. The defendants also agreed to pay for independent monitoring of the firm's affiliate network.

A statement by the Washington State Attorney General’s Office can be found here.

Last week Facebook dropped a separate lawsuit against Adscend Media.

A detailed discussion of how clickjacking works, along with a discussion of the Adscend Media settlement, can be found in a post on Sophos' Naked Security blog here. ®

Lootnote

1 Adscend counters that Washington's estimates are grossly overestimated without saying what its real revenues were nor admitting any liability on its own part. It blames rogue affiliates for the offending messages.

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Reddit users discover iOS malware threat
'Unflod Baby Panda' looks to snatch Apple IDs
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.