Feeds

Pirate island attracts more than 100 startup tenants

Green-card-free startup ship closer to international waters

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Reducing security risks from open source software

Over 100 international tech companies have registered their interest in the floating geek city, Blueseed, which will be launched next year in international waters outside of Silicon Valley.

The visa-free, start-up friendly concept launched late last year aims to create a fully commercial technology incubator where global entrepreneurs can live and work in close proximity to the Valley, accessing VC dosh and talent as required.

Significantly, Australian entrepreneurs have ranked in as the third biggest group driving demand for the project.

A new research report released by Blueseed reveals that the bulk of registered demand germinated from the US at 20.3%, Indian start-ups rank second at 10.5% and Australians third at 6%.

The research found that international start-ups nominated living and working in an “awesome” start-up- and technology- oriented space; proximity to Silicon Valley's investors and an alternative to having to get US work visas for company founders or employees as the key reasons for getting on board.

The Blueseed model budgets for around 1,000 live-in entrepreneurs on deck with costs ranging US$1,200 to $3,000 per month, per person for living quarters and office space.

It is most likely that Blueseed will revamp a decommissioned luxury cruise liner which the founders estimate would cost between $10 -$25 million to fit out.

Blueseed’s research has found that across the US, 7,000 Computer Science Master’s and PhD graduates each year are foreign nationals, with many encountering difficulties in continuing their US residence and many being forced home. ®

Blueseed's

Blujeseed's floating startup island

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
White? Male? You work in tech? Let us guess ... Twitter? We KNEW it!
Grim diversity numbers dumped alongside Facebook earnings
Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Too many IT conferences to cover? MICROSOFT to the RESCUE!
Yet more word of cuts emerges from Redmond
Chips are down at Broadcom: Thousands of workers laid off
Cellphone baseband device biz shuttered
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.