Feeds

Freed Facebook hack Brit vents fury at $200k cleanup claim

Mangham longs for security job after sentence halved on appeal

Build a business case: developing custom apps

He hits out at Facebook's $200,000 allegation

The undergraduate was mainly angry at what he claimed was Facebook's attempts to exaggerate the damage and disruption he had supposedly caused, as well as its attempt to "milk publicity" from the case:

I do not believe for a minute that this whole thing actually cost $200,000 [£122,000] to do. I fully accept that there was a cost but I cannot imagine how it ever reached such dizzying heights. Perhaps had they given some evidence to support and justify it then I would have been less critical here. Instead it was submitted very close to sentencing and accepted without any real scrutiny.

Based on the sentencing judge's comments this was one of the reasons he felt a custodial sentence inevitable.

Mangham's passport image was given to Facebook representatives and subsequently used as "some sort of trophy" in an article in Forbes, he said. Mangham, who accused Facebook of "maligning" his character during the trial, plans to return to his studies, which were disrupted by his prosecution. He still holds out the hope of getting a job in computer security:

I definitely plan to finish the final year of my degree, which was disrupted because of all the fuss and the bail conditions. I also hope to continue in the area of penetration testing as it is something that I really enjoy.

The 26-year-old does appear to be chastened by his experience, however:

I will be more cautious to have explicit permission in future. I am hoping that this incident has not caused irreparable damage to my reputation and prospects but I hope people can see why I needed to speak out. Had i quietly taken my beat down then only the 'nasty' version of events would be etched on to the internet. I would hope that telling my side of things helps people to see that where hacking is concerned, things are seldom black and white.

We asked Facebook to comment on Mangham's published criticism of its handling of his prosecution. A spokeswoman for the social network declined this invitation, saying it had nothing to add beyond its previous statement on the case.

In his blog post, Mangham concludes that he is lucky to have avoided the threat of extradition that other UK citizens are desperately fending off after they were accused of breaking US laws:

I am relieved that the ordeal is now over and that I can finally get on with my life. Despite all my moaning I suppose that in many respects I have been very lucky. I could have been subjected to the same kind of treatment as Gary McKinnon and Richard O’Dwyer and Christopher Tappin.

The lopsided-extradition treaty is doing a marvellous job at ensuring British citizens are whisked off to cloud-cuckoo land to be buried in some desert for a few years. I thank my lucky stars that I somehow avoided that fate, despite being such an obvious candidate for it.

®

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft's Euro cloud darkens: US FEDS can dig into foreign servers
They're not emails, they're business records, says court
'Things' on the Internet-of-things have 25 vulnerabilities apiece
Leaking sprinklers, overheated thermostats and picked locks all online
iWallet: No BONKING PLEASE, we're Apple
BLE-ding iPhones, not NFC bonkers, will drive trend - marketeers
Multipath TCP speeds up the internet so much that security breaks
Black Hat research says proposed protocol will bork network probes, flummox firewalls
Only '3% of web servers in top corps' fully fixed after Heartbleed snafu
Just slapping a patched OpenSSL on a machine ain't going to cut it, we're told
Plug and PREY: Hackers reprogram USB drives to silently infect PCs
BadUSB instructs gadget chips to inject key-presses, redirect net traffic and more
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Israel's Iron Dome missile tech stolen by Chinese hackers
Corporate raiders Comment Crew fingered for attacks
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?