Feeds

Microsoft guns for web sales biz in piracy crackdown

Seeks ONE MILLION pounds from pesky license evaders

New hybrid storage solutions

Microsoft reportedly has two more companies in its sight as the software giant’s licensing crackdown focuses on China.

Redmond said it is seeking compensation of at least at least 10 million yuan (£980,000) and a printed apology in the People’s Daily from two Beijing-based e-commerce firms for installing pirated versions of its software, China Daily reported.

The two related firms – Beijing Ming Wan Zhi Da Technology and Ming Wan Information Technology – apparently have branches nationwide and offer e-commerce solutions to SMBs.

They are accused of installing dodgy versions of Microsoft Windows, Office, VisualStudio, and other packages, the state-run rag reported.

However, the case has hit a snag after the judge of Beijing No. 2 Intermediate Court ruled a second trial will be necessary given that the opposing sets of lawyers are estimating hugely different figures for the economic loss Microsoft is supposed to have incurred.

Lawyers for the Beijing firms reportedly said Redmond had massively miscalculated in arriving at its 10 million yuan figure.

Microsoft could not immediately be reached for comment.

Lobby group the Business Software Alliance says 78 per cent of China's computers ran on counterfeit software in 2010, just a percentage point fewer than the year previous.

Microsoft has had some high profile successes in the past in the People’s Republic, however.

In 2009 a Shenzhen court sentenced a gang of 11 to harsh prison terms of between one and a half and six and a a half years after it found them guilty of manufacturing and distributing pirated Microsoft software worth around $2bn (£1.2bn).

In a 2010 case, Redmond won 2.17m yuan in damages from Shanghai-based Dazhong Insurance after the firm was found guilty of using unlicensed software.

The Chinese government has also realised the importance of clamping down on this kind of thing, starting with its own departments which will reportedly all be mandated to use copyrighted software by the end of 2012.

Gartner analyst Matthew Cheung said that China knows it needs to become more IP-friendly if it is to become an attractive offshore destination.

“Despite some signs of improvement, China has a long way to go to improve the piracy issue and IP protection situation,” the analyst added.®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Drag queens: Oh, don't be so bitchy, Facebook! Let us use our stage names
Handbags at dawn over free content ad network's ID policy
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
Italy's High Court orders HP to refund punter for putting Windows on PC
Top beaks slam bundled OS as 'commercial policy of forced distribution'
Former Bitcoin Foundation chair pleads guilty to money-laundering charge
Charlie Shrem plea deal could still get him five YEARS in chokey
NORKS ban Wi-Fi and satellite internet at embassies
Crackdown on tardy diplomatic sysadmins providing accidental unfiltered internet access
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.