Feeds

Microsoft guns for web sales biz in piracy crackdown

Seeks ONE MILLION pounds from pesky license evaders

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Microsoft reportedly has two more companies in its sight as the software giant’s licensing crackdown focuses on China.

Redmond said it is seeking compensation of at least at least 10 million yuan (£980,000) and a printed apology in the People’s Daily from two Beijing-based e-commerce firms for installing pirated versions of its software, China Daily reported.

The two related firms – Beijing Ming Wan Zhi Da Technology and Ming Wan Information Technology – apparently have branches nationwide and offer e-commerce solutions to SMBs.

They are accused of installing dodgy versions of Microsoft Windows, Office, VisualStudio, and other packages, the state-run rag reported.

However, the case has hit a snag after the judge of Beijing No. 2 Intermediate Court ruled a second trial will be necessary given that the opposing sets of lawyers are estimating hugely different figures for the economic loss Microsoft is supposed to have incurred.

Lawyers for the Beijing firms reportedly said Redmond had massively miscalculated in arriving at its 10 million yuan figure.

Microsoft could not immediately be reached for comment.

Lobby group the Business Software Alliance says 78 per cent of China's computers ran on counterfeit software in 2010, just a percentage point fewer than the year previous.

Microsoft has had some high profile successes in the past in the People’s Republic, however.

In 2009 a Shenzhen court sentenced a gang of 11 to harsh prison terms of between one and a half and six and a a half years after it found them guilty of manufacturing and distributing pirated Microsoft software worth around $2bn (£1.2bn).

In a 2010 case, Redmond won 2.17m yuan in damages from Shanghai-based Dazhong Insurance after the firm was found guilty of using unlicensed software.

The Chinese government has also realised the importance of clamping down on this kind of thing, starting with its own departments which will reportedly all be mandated to use copyrighted software by the end of 2012.

Gartner analyst Matthew Cheung said that China knows it needs to become more IP-friendly if it is to become an attractive offshore destination.

“Despite some signs of improvement, China has a long way to go to improve the piracy issue and IP protection situation,” the analyst added.®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
In the next four weeks, 100 people will decide the future of the web
While America tucks into Thanksgiving turkey, the world will be taking over the net
Microsoft EU warns: If you have ties to the US, Feds can get your data
European corps can't afford to get complacent while American Big Biz battles Uncle Sam
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.