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Lenovo forced to expand 'flaming' PC recall

In other recall news: saw blades pose laceration hazard

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Lenovo has been forced to expand the recall of possibly flamey desktops it first announced back in March.

The Chinese PC giant, in conjunction with the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, announced the initial recall affected around 50,500 ThinkCentre M70z and M90z desktops.

At the time, it said, "A defect in an internal component in the power supply can overheat and pose a fire hazard."

In terms of actual "incidents/injuries" at the time, the firm said it had received reports of "one fire incident and one smoke incident in the US. No injuries have been reported."

There do not appear to have been more reports of injuries or fires. Or indeed smoke. Or smoke and fire.

However, the firm has extended the range of manufacturing dates covered by the recall, meaning around 13,000 more of the $500 to $800 devices must be called in.

The agency solemnly repeated its suggested remedy for customers to avoid the possibly of smoke. Or fire. Or smoke and fire.

"Consumers should immediately stop using the computers, unplug the power supply and contact the firm to determine if your computer is included in the recall and to schedule an appointment for a free replacement of the power supply. "

It added that, "Because additional systems and manufacturing dates have been added to the recall, even those customers who contacted Lenovo regarding the March 2012 recall should contact Lenovo again to verify if their system is part of this expanded program."

The desktops had been built at the vendor's Mexican operation.

In other recall news, the CPSC announced a recall of "Irwin's Classic Series Circular Saw Blade 3-Pack" because the 10 inch blades might fall out of the pack, and cause a "laceration hazard".

No injuries have been reported, but worried consumers concerned that their saw blades might fall out of the pack and cause a laceration hazard should contact the company.

In the mean time, the agency advises, "Consumers should not disturb any saw blades that remain in the packaging but should store the saw blades in the packaging in a safe and secure location until the container arrives, then immediately transfer the saw blades to the container and discard the original packaging." ®

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