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US doc finally fingers elusive G-spot

83-year-old corpse flashes Earth-moving button

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A retired US doctor reckons he's finally nailed the elusive Gräfenberg Spot – the alleged nerve bundle in the vagina's front wall which can legendarily provoke a profound earth-moving experience.

To pin down the G-spot, Adam Ostrzenski of the Institute of Gynecology in Florida flew to Poland last September and performed a "stratum by stratum anterior vaginal wall dissection on an 83-year-old cadaver", at the Warsaw Medical University.

Seven hours' probing revealed a "bluish grapelike" structure inside a sac, "under five layers of connective tissue and muscle, 16.5 millimetres from the upper part of the urethra".

Ostrzenski described the structure as having the characteristics of an “erectile body”, which although just 8.1 millimetres long in situ, stretched to 33 millimetres when removed.

The doctor was guided by past scientific research and anecdotal evidence in his G-spot quest. He said: "Nobody believed it could be identified. I was a sceptic myself. But I said, ‘I know this is going to be the location'."

Obviously, the subject of his dissection "was not in the position to communicate" if he'd really hit the spot, but Ostrzenski believes "the existing scientific literature" led him to the site of the sexual holy grail.

His findings, due to be published in the May issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine, are likely to be controversial. In 2010, UK researchers concluded the G-spot "may be a figment of women's imagination, encouraged by magazines and sex therapists".

The French were unimpressed with this Anglo-Saxon analysis, suggesting Brits simply didn't know where to look.

However, an American search team also failed to locate the G-spot last year, insisting there was no "strong and consistent evidence for the existence of an anatomical site that could be related to the famed G-spot".

Ostrzenski now intends to return to Poland in May to confirm his findings in female corpses of different ages. He's not allowed to do such "forensic" procedures on bodies in the US and Canada, and although Poland's a long way to go in search of the G-spot, the good doctor handily "has relatives and old friends to visit there while he waits" for suitable candidates for dissection. ®

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