Feeds

John Lewis touts own-brand broadband

ISP for the middle classes

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

The British middle classes' favourite high street retailer, John Lewis, is renowned for its customer service.

Britain's ISPs are not renowned for their customer service, although sometimes they are fast and often they are cheap.

So one can see why John Lewis thinks it will make a significant splash with this week's own-brand broadband and phone service launch.

John Lewis Broadband offers no activation fees, freephone support and a free wireless router. There are three packages, all on 12-month "no hidden catches" contracts.

  • Standard - up to 16Mbps, 20GB cap, £24.50 a month
  • Unlimited - up to 16Mbps, No limit, £31.50
  • Fibre - up to 38Mbps, 100GB cap, £38.50

In the any questions section of its website John Lewis Broadband says it uses traffic management. Also the service will "let you know if you're approaching your package's limit. Once you've reached it you can buy more gigabytes for £5 per 5GB".

This is not the budget end of the market, where Tesco Broadband plays, for instance.

Virtual is as virtual does

John Lewis is already a broadband service provider through its Greenbee and Waitrose brands. The Sheffield ISP Plusnet supplies these services, making John Lewis a "virtual ISP" in industry parlance.

We assume that it remains a virtual ISP, with John Lewis Broadband, and we will tell you who the provider is, or providers are, when we find out.

John Lewis wants all Waitrose and Greenbee customers to upgrade to JLB, but it may lose some along the way, as it is phasing out those services in a few months.

We also assume John Lewis knows what it is letting itself in for as it has some broadband form. But who loves their ISP?

Bad internet days translate to bad ISP in most people's eyes. And John Lewis surely is placing its hard-won reputation for customer service at risk.

Commentards, speak your piece in the new El Reg Forums.

Let's have a poll, shall we?

JavaScript Disabled

Please Enable JavaScript to use this feature.

®

Bootnote

Some of you may recall that El Reg had its own virtual ISP service, once. It was called VCISP.net - the VC stood for Vultural Capitalist - and ran for maybe six months until March 2003 when the service provider Affinity Internet sold its ISP operations shortly before going bust. About 1000 people had signed up for the service, - and no we never did get paid by Affinity.

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE accused of silencing customer gripes on social media pages
Hello. HELLO. Can EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE HEAR ME?!
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
Broadband slow and expensive? Blame Telstra says CloudFlare
Won't peer, will gouge for Internet transit
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?