Feeds

Intel to ship 30 MILLION Ultrabooks in 2012 - report

Chipzilla's target is 40 per cent of consumer notebooks by end of year

High performance access to file storage

Intel has reportedly estimated that Ultrabook shipments will not exceed 30 million in 2012, a figure which could be some way lower than the one bandied about by CEO Paul Otellini, who predicted that 40 per cent of consumer notebooks would be Ultrabooks by the end of the year.

The reports admittedly came from the rather dubious “sources from the upstream supply chain” who told Digitimes that Chipzilla’s internal estimates are for shipments of 20-30m in 2012, followed by two or even three times that in 2013.

The report went on to claim that Intel is working with upstream manufacturers to ensure that plastic chassis some are building meet the Ultrabook standards for sturdiness and quality.

When asked to confirm the figure of 20-30m, Intel offered The Register the following canned statement:

We’ve set ambitious goals, and we’re thrilled with the reception to Ultrabook devices so far. There’s already been a lot of enthusiasm around the category and this is just the beginning for Ultrabook – we’re just getting started. Our goal is to work with the industry to transform personal computing by delivering a single device that offers the most complete, satisfying, no-compromise and more secure experience in sleek, beautiful designs.

A spokesman also confirmed the chip giant’s aggressive 2012 targets for the category, which were repeated by Otellini on a conference call in January.

“The goal we stated at Computex 2011 was specific to shifting 40 per cent of the global consumer notebook market segment to Ultrabook systems by the end of 2012,” he told The Reg.

“As I said, we’ve set ambitious goals, and we’re thrilled with the reception to Ultrabook devices so far.”

To drill down a bit into that figure, IDC said it is expecting 147m consumer notebooks to be shipped in 2012. Now, 40 per cent of that figure is 58.8m – significantly higher than the 30m which Digitimes is saying the chip giant is now predicting.

However, crucially, Intel is saying the 40 per cent target applies only to the end of 2012, not for the entire year, which makes comparisons with the Digitimes report more problematic.

In any case, IDC vice president Bryan Ma told The Reg that the figures mentioned by the Digitimes sources chime pretty much with the 25 million Ultrabook units the analyst is predicting will be shipped this year.

“We do have a more aggressive scenario of 37 million shipments, but price point is key here,” he added.

“Prices have hovered around $999, which is a challenge. Now, though, we’re seeing some vendors announcing plans to deploy Ultrabooks at around the $699 price point which pushes us towards that more aggressive scenario.”

Storage will be key in helping vendors to push prices down, Ma argued.

More vendors are looking at dual drive machines using magnetic storage and flash to reduce costs while still providing the fast start-up time required by Intel for its Ultrabooks, he said.

®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Report: Apple seeking to raise iPhone 6 price by a HUNDRED BUCKS
'Well, that 5c experiment didn't go so well – let's try the other direction'
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Nvidia gamers hit trifecta with driver, optimizer, and mobile upgrades
Li'l Shield moves up to Android 4.4.2 KitKat, GameStream comes to notebooks
Gimme a high S5: Samsung Galaxy S5 puts substance over style
Biometrics and kid-friendly mode in back-to-basics blockbuster
AMD unveils Godzilla's graphics card – 'the world's fastest, period'
The Radeon R9 295X2: Water-cooled, 5,632 stream processors, 11.5TFLOPS
Sony battery recall as VAIO goes out with a bang, not a whimper
The perils of having Panasonic as a partner
NORKS' own smartmobe pegged as Chinese landfill Android
Fake kit in the hermit kingdom? That's just Kim Jong-un-believable!
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.