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Phone-hack saga: Prosecutors mull charges for 11 suspects

Four hacks, one cop and six citizens on CPS dartboard so far...

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Four journalists and one cop have been pinpointed by the UK's Crown Prosecution Service over alleged offences relating to phone hacking, it emerged today.

The CPS confirmed to The Register that 11 suspects could face prosecution over misdeeds that led to the scandal that rocked Rupert Murdoch's media empire and damaged the reputation of the Metropolitan police force.

It said prosecutors were mulling over the following information:

One file for charging advice relating to one journalist and one police officer with relation to alleged offences of misconduct in public office and the Data Protection Act.

One file for charging advice relating to one journalist and six other members of the public with relation to alleged offences of perverting the course of justice.

One file for charging advice relating to one journalist with relation to alleged offences of witness intimidation and harassment.

One file for charging advice relating to one journalist with relation to alleged offences under RIPA.

A total of 43 people have been arrested to date by Scotland Yard cops working on three investigations into alleged voicemail interception, corrupt payments to police officers and computer hacking.

No charges have yet been brought against any of those people questioned by the Met. Those arrested and later bailed in the three inquiries – Operation Weeting, Op Elveden and Op Tuleta – have included ex-News International boss and one-time Murdoch darling Rebekah Brooks.

The CPS told El Reg that it was "not prepared to discuss the identities of those involved or the alleged offences in any greater detail at this stage as a number of related investigations are ongoing".

It added: "We are unable to give any timescale for charging decisions, except to say that these cases are being considered very carefully and thoroughly, and the decisions will be made as soon as is practicable." ®

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