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Speaking in Tech: Forget G-Drive hype, try Dropbox-for-Big-Biz

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speaking_in_tech Greg Knieriemen podcast enterprise

Enterprise tech guru Greg Knieriemen, and master of all that is cloud and storage Ed Saipetch, are back with another episode of enterprise and consumer tech-cast Speaking in Tech. This week, web2.0 and social media analyst Sarah Vela mysteriously goes AWOL ... after just three episodes. We find out why as the guys discuss all the latest trends in enterprise tech.

Speaking in Tech's special guest this week is Brian Katz. Brian works at Sanofi Pharmaceuticals, a global pharmaceutical company, where he is in charge of its mobile engineering group. You can follow him on Twitter here or read his blog, A screw's loose, here.

The gang also plan their June live-podcast raid at Dell Storage Forum in Boston and HP Discover in Las Vegas.

This week they talk about...

  • Google Drive's launch next week. Various internet reports claim that Google will be launching Google Drive next week with 5GB - more than double the 2GB that come with the popular Dropbox. From the reports, Google Drive will work “in desktop folders” on Mac, Windows, iOS and Android.
  • Meanwhile, a leaked VMware Memo outlines View 5.1 – aka Project Octopus – the cloud storage service referred to as "Dropbox for the enterprise". The leaked doc pegs it as coming out by the end of June...
  • Brian on consumerisation: You want me to do what? A mobile strategy challenge
  • Are “acceptable use” policies effective?
  • Mobile security: The distinction between iOS devices and Android on security and compliance.
  • BYOD: It’s not about saving money...
  • Brian faces down the 10 Big Questions.

Listen with the Reg player below, or download here.

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