Feeds

Paddy Power website fell at Grand National first fence

Wagering whale fails for 20 mins on race day

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Irish betting behemoth Paddy Power is giving out a free bet to customers after its website crashed for 20 minutes just before the Grand National horse race on Saturday.

Sheer traffic on the day sent the site falling at the first fence and only getting its legs again 15 minutes before the race. Some punters told The Reg they weren't able to log in to get their winnings just after the race either.

The gambling nirvana sent out a missive to all its customers offering the free bet and apologising for its website's fail.

The email read:

Having offered 5 Places on the Grand National, we experienced the busiest day in our history with unprecedented numbers of customers placing their National bet with Paddy Power. Unfortunately, in the run up to the race, we experienced some technical issues which meant that many of our customers were unable to access our site.

After a very busy Cheltenham we were very confident that we were well prepared to handle Grand National Saturday, which is always the busiest day of the year for us. While most of our customers were able to get their bet on the race some were unsuccessful and this is not the level of service that we strive to deliver."

A Paddy Power spokesperson said that the free bet was a goodwill gesture and the betting group was happy to give it to its customers, but added that most people had gotten their bet on because the site was back a quarter of an hour before the race.

Having a flutter on the Grand National is something of a British and Irish tradition, even for those who aren't usually the betting kind, and with both economies in the doldrums, there were probably more gamblers than ever.

However the race has come in for a lot of criticism for the height of the fences and the number of riders, both pointed to as the reason for the frequent horse deaths. This year, two horses, including the hot favourite Synchronised, died out of the 22 who fell at the fences. Last year, four horses were fatally injured. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.