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The spotlight on Julian Assange is on high beam, this time masterminded by his own content production efforts.

Assange warned us in January that he would be launching his own pirate TV talk show.

This Tuesday (April 17) the hotly anticipated production will go live, branded The World Of Tomorrow.

To whet our appetite, the Wikileaks founder has promised that the first 26-minute episode will feature a mystery “a notorious guest”.

Assange said that his decision to do the show was driven by being under house arrest for so long. “It’s nice to have an occasional visitor and to learn more about the world. And given that the conversations we were having are quite interesting, why not film them and show other people what was going on.”

Assange says his guests will be "iconoclasts, visionaries and power insiders" and that his unnamed show is already licensed to broadcasters commanding more than 600 million viewers.

The show will be broadcast with RT, Russia’s state-funded multilingual network. It is understood that 12 episodes have been completed and will air on RT, as well as online and on “other networks”.

“Through this series I will explore the possibilities for our future in conversations with those who are shaping it. Are we heading towards utopia or dystopia and how we can set our paths? This is an exciting opportunity to discuss the vision of my guests in a new style of show that examines their philosophies and struggles in a deeper and clearer way than has been done before,” he said.

Assange, is still creatively languishing under UK house arrest awaiting a decision on extradition to Sweden.

Showing that he has not lost touch with contemporary culture, the music for the show has been composed by Sri Lankan rapette, M.I.A.

Apparently M.I.A. hs been hanging with Assange in London, visiting him in his exiled state.

In 2010 she released a mixtape called “Vicki Leekx and has been vociferous in her Assange support.

As noted lasted week, production has started in Australia for a docu-drama called Underground, covering Assange’s early hacking life.

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