Feeds

Chinese coders beat all-comers

Technology gulf between east and west clear to see

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Does China have the best hackers in the world? Well, new stats from code sprint site Interview Street would seem to indicate that they certainly dominate the global rankings when it comes to programming skills.

The Bangalore-based web company provides a platform for coders to measure their abilities in a series of pre-assigned tests, before evaluating and ranking users on a leaderboard.

With clients such as Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft and EMC, the site has grown quickly to become widely known as one of the best places for ambitious programmers to get noticed by the big boys.

A glance at the current leaderboard shows nine of the top ten coders hail from China and five more occupy positions in 11-20 – pretty compelling statistics.

Some reports have suggested rather alarmingly that this proves the pre-eminence of Chinese hackers worldwide, but if anything it’s just another indication of the dearth of young talent coming through in science and technology subjects in the West.

As has been the case for decades now, in the UK at least, science and tech subjects are on the decline at school and university level while students favour arts and languages course in ever greater numbers.

The government’s announcement last year of an overhaul to GCSE and A-Level exams to include more focus on coding and programming is a step in the right direction but fails to address the basic fact that sci-tech courses don’t have the requisite cool to attract large numbers of students.

Security experts have warned, however, that this could ultimately affect the UK’s ability to defend against a growing wave of cyber threats.

According to a recent high profile report by US defence contractor Northrop Grumman, the Chinese government ploughs obscene amounts of money into university technology programs covering areas such as information warfare - money western states couldn't hope to match.

While it doesn’t tell the whole story, looking at the Interview Street leaderboard in this context does make for particularly grim reading. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email
Print this article out and give it to someone tech-y if you get stuck
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Entity Framework goes 'code first' as Microsoft pulls visual design tool
Visual Studio database diagramming's out the window
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.