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Chinese military contractor hits back at hacktivist Hardcore Charlie

Allegations the firm was hacked are "groundless"

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A Chinese military contractor has strongly denied recent allegations that it was hacked by the Anonymous-affiliated ‘Hardcore Charlie’, but the hacktivist has responded by leaking more documents including US military data which he claims the firm has shared with Vietnam, Ukraine and Russia.

Beijing based China National Import & Export Corp (CEIEC), which sells a range of military kit including electronic warfare, radar and logistics gear, said in a terse statement on Friday that “the information reported is totally groundless, highly subjective and defamatory”.

It added the following:

In the past 32 years, CEIEC, strictly abiding by the law of China, complying with international principles and customs and sticking to honest operation, has won the respect and honour from people of all fields, including the media.

At the present, illegal attack has become a big threat to the internet security, and the collusion of hacking and defamation challenges the social morality and law. While it is believed that the media and netizen with strong sense of social responsibility are able to distinguish between right and wrong, so the internet justice and security could be maintained.

CEIEC reserves the right to take legal action against the relevant responsible individuals and institutions.

The firm’s beef is with a hacktivist who goes by the name of Hardcore Charlie on Twitter and who last week claimed to have hacked the military contractor, posting data dumps to Photbucket and Pastebin which he said revealed CEIEC had gotten hold of sensitive US army data.

He then claimed the Chinese firm had leaked the sensitive data – some of which appears to relate to the US army’s operations in Afghanistan – to malicious third parties including the Taliban.

Doubts were raised about the authenticity of the files however as the hacktivist is associated with a hacker known on Twitter as YamaTough, who has previously falsified certain documents which he claimed were hacked from the Indian military.

Undeterred, ‘Hardcore Charile’ has taken to Twitter once more to refute CEIEC’s statement and post links to another set of data he claims to have snarfed from the contractor.

“When it comes to US screwed up CN will never admit to any leaks just like US admits no MIL exposure Expect more,” he wrote in a post on Saturday.

The hacktivist is also claiming the documents have been shared with terrorists in the Ukraine and Russian as well as third parties in Syria and Vietnam. ®

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