Feeds
90%
HTC One X quad-core Android smartphone

HTC One X Android smartphone

Quad-core corker

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Boost IT visibility and business value

Review HTC messed up in 2011 by releasing too many similar handsets. There was nothing actually wrong with phones likes the Sensation, Sensation XL, Sensation XE or Incredible S but equally none of them had me itching to upgrade my Desire HD ahead of schedule.

HTC One X quad-core Android smartphone

The X factor: HTC's One X

Now HTC is hoping to turn things around by putting its eggs in the One basket. For the penurious it has the One V. For middle income types the One S. But what I have here is the top tomato, the One X. A phone HTC is hoping will be considered the best you can get.

Let’s start with the headline specs. The screen is a 4.7in 720p affair with a pixel count of 312dpi. The CPU is a 1.5GHz penta-core Nvidia Tegra 3 unit with 1GB of Ram. Keeping all that in step is Android 4 Ice Cream Sandwich allied to HTC’s new Sense 4.0.

HTC One X quad-core Android smartphone

Long and slim

The exterior of the One X is a gently curved and understated affair and the back has a pleasant matte surface. The look works for me because it doesn’t try as hard to impress as Sony’s new Xperia devices or the Samsung Galaxy Nexus. Build quality is rock solid too, due to the body being carved from a single chunk of polycarbonate plastic much like the Nokia N9 and Lumia 800, while the screen is good old Corning Gorilla Glass.

Below the screen you will find three capacitive buttons – back, home and recent apps – rather than the four of previous HTC handsets. I never use the fourth search button on my Desire HD, so it’s a change I can’t complain about.

HTC One X quad-core Android smartphone

Screen resolution is a pin sharp 312dpi

The edge of the handset is interrupted only by a 3.5mm audio jack on the top, the power and volume controls and a micro USB port – with the optional AC M490 cable this connection provides an HDMI output. There’s no memory card slot but with 32GB on board I can live with that. The X takes a micro SIM rather than standard-sized card.

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Next page: Chart topper

More from The Register

next story
iWatch watch: Apple tags sales bod from luxury Swiss watch firm
TAG Heuer retail man pinched for wearables division
IBM's $3bn bet on next-gen computers: Carbon nanotubes, neuro chips
Big Blue exec tells El Reg what to keep an eye on
Phone motion sensors can receive data
Short-range comms keeps secrets better, say boffins
Bloodied Samsung's profits down 25% as it clings to mobe crown
How will it ever survive on $7.1bn operating profit?
Dammit, Foxconn: Where's our 1 MILLION-strong robot ARMY?
'Foxbots' just aren't good enough to take up the slack
LG unfurls flexible SEE-THROUGH 18-inch display
Roll up, roll up for 60-inch telly scrolls by 2017
SolidRun pitches upgradeable SBC into the IoT fray
Yet another board to take on Raspberry Pi
Military-grade bruiser: Getac F110 rugged tablet... is no iPad
Intel Core i5, 11.6 inches, tough as old boots Windows slab
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization
Virtualization continues to be one of the most effective ways to consolidate, reduce cost, and make data centers more efficient.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.