Feeds

Intel outlines open source development projects

Connman has fingers in many pockets

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Collaboration Summit 2012 The director of Intel's Open Source Technology Center Imad Sousou outlined the chip giant's plans to invest in the open source community and provided an update on two key projects, speaking at the Linux Foundation's Collaboration Summit in San Francisco.

Intel is fully committed to open source, Sousou explained, because it wants the maximum number of people using its hardware to the best advantage. The best way to do this is to join the community, and he said Intel was now the second biggest corporate sponsor of Linux, behind Red Hat, as well as being a board member of The Document Foundation, which produces the open source office suite LibreOffice.

"We want to end up with Linux supporting your hardware better than anyone else, so that we coevolve," he told his keynote audience on Tuesday. "Historically, we believe as technology gets better and more used, then the more Intel grows."

Imad Sousou Intel1

Intel's Imad Sousou touts Chipzilla's open source chops

He outlined current progress on a couple of projects that Intel and the Linux community are currently developing. The first, delightfully named Connman, is currently three years in development and manages internet connections, primarily for embedded devices. Sousou said the technology is currently in use in the mobile, automotive, and robotics industries, and is a good example of how the open source community can do things that commercial vendors can't or won't.

"We needed a very small connection manager that doesn't impose a user interface, not derived from a PC or desktop systems, that we could use with embedded and mobile systems," he explained. "We didn't find anything that existed that was suitable, and outside Connman that's true even today."

Intel is also working on the Yocto meta-project – another good cause with a silly name – that aims to build embedded Linux systems across a wide variety of platforms. Sousou said that Intel is investing heavily in Yocto, even though that means helping to develop systems for hardware from competitors such as AMD.

He told the assembled open source coders to advise their bosses that corporate sponsorship of Linux was a good use of company resources, rather than trying to sell them on the concept of open systems themselves.

"We want Linux to get better, because we all benefit from that," Sousou said. "But don't argue about the philosophy of it – one of the key reasons to support Linux is the business case." ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
HTML5 vs native: Harry Coder and the mudblood mobile app princes
Developers just want their ideas to generate money
prev story

Whitepapers

Seattle children’s accelerates Citrix login times by 500% with cross-tier insight
Seattle Children’s is a leading research hospital with a large and growing Citrix XenDesktop deployment. See how they used ExtraHop to accelerate launch times.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.