Feeds

Champagne at CSIRO after WiFi patent settlement

US carriers cough up

Business security measures using SSL

Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation has won another round of its long-running patent battle with US carriers AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile offering a settlement worth more than $AU220 million.

The three carriers had been resisting paying royalties to the agency, and as recently as last Friday (March 30) were still expected to kick off their own case against the so-called “069 patent”.

Back in 2009, action by a number of big-name US vendors – HP, Asus, Intel, Dell, Toshiba, Netgear, D-Link, Belkin, SMC, Accton, 3Com, Buffalo Technologies, Microsoft and Nintendo – reached a settlement for more than $AU200 million. That success was followed by further licensing deals, with total royalties so far in excess of $AU400 million.

The 069 patent is based on the use of techniques first applied to radio astronomy, in particular fourier transforms, to overcoming multipath distortion of wireless network signals. This work led John O’Sullivan – an electrical engineer specializing in radio astronomy – to receive the 2009 Prime Minister’s Prize for Science. Others at CSIRO – a team including Diet Ostrey, Terry Percival, Graham Daniels and John Deane – completed the task of applying O’Sullivan’s work to computer networks, culminating in a technology now used in the 802.11a and 802.11g standards.

The latest win was announced by minister for science and research, Senator Chris Evans.

The patent could yet net more filthy lucre for the science agency. Other vendors targeted in cases brought by CSIRO, and not identified as in the current settlement, include Sony and Lenovo. ®

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.