Feeds

Adobe auto-update eases Flash update chore - on Windows only

Backdoors plugged without lifting a finger

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Adobe has introduced an auto-updater for its Flash software packages that reduces the chore of updating the widely-used application by automating the process for all supported browsers on Windows machines. Previously users had to apply individual updates to Chrome, Firefox and IE add-ons and plug-ins, a process that often went neglected, leaving systems open to attack.

The auto-update tool was released on Wednesday alongside a cross-platform update that addresses two memory corruption-type vulnerabilities in versions 10 and 11, the currently-supported version of Flash. The update applies to all operating systems, Windows, Mac OS X, Linux and Android smartphones and is rated "priority 2" by Adobe, which means the "critical" vulnerabilities covered are yet to be weaponised into exploits or abused in malware but are still nasty and ought to be patched within the next month.

Users of Adobe on Windows, Macintosh and Android are also affected by the same set of bugs and also need to upgrade, as explained in a security alert by Adobe here.

Cloud-based security services firm Qualys welcomed the auto-updating feature as a big step forward for Adobe, whose update process has historically been a bit of a chore.

"The most interesting addition to this version of Flash is that Adobe included an automatic update feature," writes Wolfgang Kandek, CTO of Qualys in a blog post. "If the user opts-in the player will in the future silently update all browsers on the system to the most current version of Flash. We highly recommend to opt-in, running on the latest version of Flash adds considerable resilience to one's setup, plus it avoids the chore of updating all of your installed browsers by hand."

Adobe "background updater" for Flash is Windows only, at least for now. More details on how the technology works are explained in a blog post by Adobe here. ®

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
Infosec geniuses hack a Canon PRINTER and install DOOM
Internet of Stuff securo-cockups strike yet again
'Speargun' program is fantasy, says cable operator
We just might notice if you cut our cables
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
Israeli spies rebel over mass-snooping on innocent Palestinians
'Disciplinary treatment will be sharp and clear' vow spy-chiefs
YouTube, Amazon and Yahoo! caught in malvertising mess
Cisco says 'Kyle and Stan' attack is spreading through compromised ad networks
Hackers pop Brazil newspaper to root home routers
Step One: try default passwords. Step Two: Repeat Step One until success
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
Microsoft to patch ASP.NET mess even if you don't
We know what's good for you, because we made the mess says Redmond
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.