Feeds

Google I/O conference sells out in 20 minutes

Profit-hungry scalpers flock to eBay

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

Tickets for Google's annual I/O developer conference have sold out in less than 20 minutes, and scalpers have already taken to eBay to cash in on the show's popularity.

Google has run the I/O conference since 2008, and this year's show is scheduled to take place in San Francisco on June 27 through 29 – the first time the show has been stretched to three days rather than two. Tickets went on sale Tuesday morning at 7am Pacific Time and hits on the website hit 6,250 queries per second, the demand was so great.

"While we're overwhelmed with the interest and enthusiasm around Google I/O, we know it can be very disappointing and frustrating when an event sells out this quickly," said Vic Gundotra, senior vice president of social business at Google on his Google+ page.

In order to make up for the lack of tickets, Gundotra said that the company would stream keynotes and main breakout sessions as they happened, and would make individual session videos available online within 24 hours. The company would also support viewing parties around the world.

Google I/O has become one of the top developer conferences on the calendar, in part because of its importance to developers of Android, Chrome, and – to a much lesser extent – Chrome OS. The Chocolate Factory also shows off its latest creations and hands out coding samples to give developers a head start on new apps.

Some delegates are also motivated by the freebies that come with a conference ticket. Last year, for example, attendees got a special edition Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1-inch tablet, as well as a Chromebook from the Korean box-shifter. The previous year, Google handed out free Sprint EVO 4G phones and an additional handset – Verizon Droids for US developers and NTC Nexus Ones for non-US visitors.

Needless to say, scalpers got wise to the popularity of the event, and eBay already has tickets on offer with mark-ups that even Apple would draw the line at. Google raised the standard ticket price to $900 this year, double last year's early-bird discount price, but auctions on eBay are already offering them for up to $4,500 apiece. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
'People have forgotten just how late the first iPhone arrived ...'
Plus: 'Google's IDEALISM is an injudicious justification for inappropriate biz practices'
Mathematica hits the Web
Wolfram embraces the cloud, promies private cloud cut of its number-cruncher
Mozilla shutters Labs, tells nobody it's been dead for five months
Staffer's blog reveals all as projects languish on GitHub
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
iOS 8 Healthkit gets a bug SO Apple KILLS it. That's real healthcare!
Not fit for purpose on day of launch, says Cupertino
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.