Feeds

Court shuts down site that circumvents Pirate Bay blocks

Dutch anti-piracy group wins copyright ruling against proxy operator

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

A Dutch anti-piracy group has won a court order forcing the operator of a proxy website to shut the site down after it was used to circumvent blocks to illegal file-sharing site The Pirate Bay.

BREIN won the ruling at the Court of The Hague, according to a report by the Torrent Freak website. The operator of the 'tpb.dehomies.nl' site faces a €1,000 fine for each day they fail to comply with the order.

Earlier this year BREIN won a court ruling ordering two of Holland's largest internet service providers (ISPs) to block their customers' access to The Pirate Bay. The Pirate Bay is a website that enables users to search for and download copyrighted content, including music and films.

However, some internet users have been able to get around the blocking measures introduced by the ISPs. They have set up sites which allow them to access content via proxy servers – bypassing the content filters used by the ISPs.

In addition to winning the court order, BREIN has also sent a number of letters to operators of other proxy sites it claims have enabled users to access The Pirate Bay, according to an automated translation from Dutch technology site Tweakers. The letters threaten similar legal action if the operators keep their sites online.

Tim Kuik, director of BREIN, said the proxy sites have been set up deliberately to circumvent the court injunction relating to The Pirate Bay. "If [the operators of the proxy sites] do not comply [with the letter requests], we [will] keep them liable for damages," he said, according to the Tweakers report (in Dutch).

In February the UK High Court ruled that both the operators of The Pirate Bay and its users are guilty of infringing the copyright of rights holders in the music industry. Mr Justice Arnold said that the operators had the ability to prevent illegal file-sharing from occurring on the site but chose not to. The UK's six biggest ISPs could be forced to block their customers' access to the site as a result of the ruling.

Copyright © 2012, OUT-LAW.com

OUT-LAW.COM is part of international law firm Pinsent Masons.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
Apple tried to get a ban on Galaxy, judge said: NO, NO, NO
Judge Koh refuses Samsung ban for the third time
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?