Feeds

Oz national broadcaster goes open with archives

Releases historical snippets under CC license

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Application security programs and practises

While national digital archiving strategies in Australia move slowly, some agencies are taking things into their own hands. The latest is the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, which has put slabs of archival material under a Wikimedia license.

The move is part of the ABC’s 80th anniversary celebration, centered around its 80 Days that Changed our Lives website, and which contains some of the archival material now released under the Creative Commons license.

One gem among the releases is a 1974 clip in which Arthur C Clarke predicts home computers connected to world-wide networks – what we think of as the Internet. He tells the ABC Perspectives reporter, in a program called C for Computer, that his 9-year-old son (brought along for the interview) will, by 2001, take this kind of computer network “as much for granted as we take the telephone”.

The ABC says its decision will support “the work of creative producers … making some of its unique content available to a broader audience with a license that explicitly allows remix and commercial use”.

Obliquely, the ABCs archive release also highlights an emerging concern in the digital era – while library deposit schemes around the world have served to maintain print archives, audio/visual and digital materials are served badly.

It’s an issue that the Australia is currently working through with proposals for legal deposit of digital material. Earlier this month, Attorney-General Nicola Roxon launched a discussion paper on digital legal deposit, with comments open until April 14.

Australia’s National Archives is also working on a digital continuity strategy to address a similar problem. Its plan is designed to help federal government agencies determine the lifetime, management, accessibility and authenticity of digital information. Similar strategies are at various levels of development at a state level. ®

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Sit back down, Julian Assange™, you're not going anywhere just yet
Swedish court refuses to withdraw arrest warrant
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Delaware pair nabbed for getting saucy atop Mexican eatery
Burrito meets soft taco in alleged rooftop romp outrage
LightSquared backer sues FCC over spectrum shindy
Why, we might as well have been buying AIR
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.