Feeds

Cybercops traced Toulouse massacre suspect through IP address

Slain soldier's ad for motorcycle had key role in manhunt

3 Big data security analytics techniques

The IP address of a computer used to view a motorbike sales ad posted by an early victim of the Toulouse gunman played a vital role in narrowing down Mohamed Merah as the main suspect in a series of attacks that have horrified France, it has emerged.

French soldier Imad Ibn-Ziaten posted a video of the motorbike he wanted to sell online. The paratrooper was killed on 11 March after he invited someone who posed as a prospective buyer to his house.

Le Monde reports (Google translation here) that the ad was viewed by about 500 people. Cyber police narrowed down the list of likely suspects to those who lived in and around Toulouse in south-west France. This search was intensified after Ibn-Ziaten's assassination was linked to the slaughter of three children and a rabbi at a Jewish school in Toulouse on Monday, 19 March.

In addition, Le Monde added, a motorcycle dealer had reported a suspicious conversation with someone who wanted to know whether it was possible to remove an anti-theft tracking device from a Yamaha scooter just days before the vehicle was stolen on 6 March and before the first attacks against French soldiers. The twin strands of evidence allowed police to compile a shortlist of suspects.

Merah was already under surveillance by French authorities and the use of an IP address, which was linked to his brother's house, to view Ibn-Ziaten's motorcycle video made him a prime suspect in the case.

In the early hours of Wednesday a French anti-terrorist unit surrounded a block of flats where the reportedly heavily armed Mohamed Merah lived, leading to a siege that ended after police stormed his flat on Thursday morning. Merah jumped out of a window while firing back at cops and was subsequently found dead on the ground. It is as yet unclear whether the fall or police snipers killed him.

During the firefight, Merah reportedly proclaimed allegiance to al Qaida and admitted responsibility for shooting dead of three French soldiers in two ambushes last week as well as the attack on the Jewish school. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.