Feeds

LibreOffice will have roadmap for cloud service next month

Releases last build of 3.4 fork

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The Document Foundation (TDF), which produces the leading open source office software suite LibreOffice, is on schedule for the release of its plan to offer a cloud version of its software next month.

The team released the last update to its 3.4 build on Thursday and is now focused on developing version 3.5 further, but the group is now also ready to detail its plans for cloud services in April. That said, the team reserves the right to hold off on launch until the last few software fixes come in, TDF spokesman Italo Vignoli told The Register.

"At the moment we are focusing more on this because of some of the opportunities that are arising, which we can't disclose now," he explained. "We will have the cloud version roadmap out in April."

The final build of the 3.4 fork, version 3.4.6, fixes a possible security hole in XML handling, as well as tweaking the build with small refinements. Updates to version 3.5, which was released in February, are now well underway and the team is also looking to port the software to other platforms.

Vignoli said that LibreOffice for Android was well under way, with about 80 per cent of the porting complete and over half the coding left to do. The interface is the area that now needs most work done before release, and the iOS port will be released after the Android version.

TDF is also close to finalizing its certification process for developers and third-party consultants, so that enterprises looking to use the software can hire qualified people to ease integration. The quickest move towards this, however, is to get involved in the project, Vignoli said.

So far, TDF is getting a lot of support from the development community. Around 10 to 20 developers were joining the project every month, and the team has managed to get 12 builds out in the last 18 months. By comparison, the former top dog in the open source software field, OpenOffice, is still waiting to do a major update to its code base, although Apache is promising this soon. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
The cloud that goes puff: Seagate Central home NAS woes
4TB of home storage is great, until you wake up to a dead device
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
Intel offers ingenious piece of 10TB 3D NAND chippery
The race for next generation flash capacity now on
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.