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iPhone 5 gets a 5in screen

Credibility, pockets to be strained

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The iPhone 5 will sport a five-inch - 4.6in to be precise - screen.

Well, that's if you believe the claims of an unnamed industry source - almost certainly a bod from either Samsing or LG - quoted by a South Korean newspaper, Maeil Business.

Big screens are in, apparently. When questioned, punters say they favour screen sizes of four inches and up, and with the current iPhone dawdling behind with a mere 3.5in panel, Apple clearly feels the need to keep up.

Or maybe not.

Bigger screens are no bad thing, of course, provided they don't inflate a phone to even more pocket-straining proportions. Reg Hardware quite likes the Samsung Galaxy Note, for instance, for its 5.3in display, but it's a bonkers size for a telephone.

Even 4.6-inchers a pushing the physical envelope too far, we think. What about you?

Meanwhile, the iPhone 5, which is said by some to be set for a June introduction - though a September debut, a year on from the 4S, seems more likely - will undoubtedly be better than the last one. ®

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