Feeds

Russian cops cuff 8 in Carberp Trojan case

Alleged to be millionaire phishing gang

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Russian police have arrested a group of eight men suspected of making millions in electronic banking fraud using the Carberp Trojan and other strains of malware.

The men are suspected of being part of a Moscow-based gang that is targeting Russian nationals, and which has raked in 60m rubles (£1.3m) since October 2011. The scheme uses malware to steal login credentials for victims' online banking accounts. Funds from an estimated 90 compromised accounts have been transferred to accounts under the control of the gang, prior to the withdrawal of funds from various Moscow ATMs, according to a statement by the Russian Interior Ministry (Google translation here).

The arrested suspects include two unnamed brothers, aged 29 and 32, whom Russian cops believe to be the ringleaders of the gang.

The group's stock in trade involved planting malicious scripts on the websites of Russian newspaper and other popular sites. The scripts were used to run drive-by download attacks ultimately designed to create a credential stealing botnet.

The suspects rented an office from which they allegedly ran the scam under the guise of operating a legitimate computer firm. This office and the home of the suspects were raided by armed officers from the Russian Interior Ministry and FSB, the Russian security service. The police service said the raids had recovered computer equipment, a large number of bank cards, 7.5m rubles (£162,000) and a number of forged documents.

Suspects in the case have been charged with various offences under the Russian criminal code covering theft, computer hacking and malware distribution. The majority have been placed under house arrest pending trials, where they face charges punishable by up to 10 years behind bars if they are convicted.

Russia and the Ukraine, in particular, are seen from the outside as safe havens for cybercrime. It's tempting to think that the suspects in the case would have been far less likely to get caught if they had not targeted Russian citizens. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
Mozilla, EFF, Cisco back free-as-in-FREE-BEER SSL cert authority
Let’s Encrypt to give HTTPS-everywhere a boost in 2015
Meet OneRNG: a fully-open entropy generator for a paranoid age
Kiwis to seek random investors for crowd-funded randomiser
USB coding anarchy: Consider all sticks licked
Thumb drive design ruled by almighty buck
Attack reveals 81 percent of Tor users but admins call for calm
Cisco Netflow a handy tool for cheapskate attackers
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.