Feeds

Windows 8

Apple iOS 7 makes some users literally SICK. As in puking, not upset

Excessive zoom and 3D-effect graphics in Apple's latest iOS is leaving some users reaching for the sick bucket

Windows 8 for Kindle-like gear hinted by Microsoft bigwig

COO talks up Metro's much-loved consistent UI

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Microsoft has given its strongest hint yet that Windows 8 on ARM (WoA) will run on a new generation of Kindle-style e-readers.

The company's chief operating officer Kevin Turner opened Microsoft’s Dynamics 2012 conference by rattling off a list of devices that’ll benefit from a consistent user interface because Windows 8 runs on both x86 and ARM architectures.

Buried among the devices is the e-reader.

A bombastic Turner was addressing 10,000 attendees at Microsoft’s shindig for anyone turned on by Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) and Customer Relationship Management (CRM) kit. He said Windows 8 will be the “first operating system on the planet” to provide the same user interface from handheld gadgets powered by ARM Systems-on-a-Chip (SoC) to fatter boxes with x86 chips from Intel and AMD.

“Microsoft will be this year the first company on the planet to have a consistent UI from the smart phone to the tablet to the slate, to the reader to the rich client and to the TV with our Metro UI,” he said. “We know the power of getting that consistent user experience is something our whole product portfolio will benefit from.”

So far, Microsoft has said little about WOA beyond the fact that it’s coming. In February the software biz emitted a Windows 8 Consumer Preview build for punters to test drive, but this was for x86 machines.

Metro-syle Dynamics

Metro-style coming to Dynamics in 2013

There’s been no word, however, on the specific devices that’ll run WOA, beyond the fact that WOA won’t be available from retailers and it’ll come only pre-installed on locked-down machines. That suggests e-readers, a category of device where Windows has yet to make any dent and that has proved popular based on Amazon's sales boom.

Also at the Dynamics event in Houston, Texas, Microsoft demonstrated its ERP and CRM software running with a Metro-style tiled UI. This will come in 2013.

On the roadmap for Dynamics in 2012 is support in the online versions of Microsoft’s CRM gear for non-Redmond browsers and devices, and “social” interaction and customer care. Microsoft’s Great Plains and Navision 2013, meanwhile, will run on Windows Azure. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?