Feeds

Pirate Bay plans sky-high flying proxy servers

RIAA will need to muster Air Force to stop LOSS

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The Pirate Bay says it is planning a fleet of airborne servers to evade the attempts of anti-piracy forces to shut down their file-sharing service.

And, no, it's not yet April Fools' Day.

The team behind the site says that the falling cost of GPS and remote-controlled drone technology, coupled with the advent of systems such as the $35 Raspberry Pi Linux machine, have inspired the idea. Since the situation on land is getting trickier, the team said they are planning Low Orbit Server Stations (LOSS) to evade both state controls and the site's current legal issues.

"We're going to experiment with sending out some small drones that will float some kilometers up in the air," said team member Mr. Spock in a blog posting. "This way our machines will have to be shut down with aeroplanes in order to shut down the system. A real act of war."

The designs call for a basic proxy system of drones that would allow data speeds of 100Mb/s per node from up to 50km away, although Spock provided no information about the wireless technology to be used that was any more specific than "modern radio transmitters".

The Pirate Bay thinks that they could get a basic front-end for the system up and running – and flying – which would then redirect users to secret land-based servers. Looking much further ahead, the post claims that plans are afoot for a "galactic" service, which would use parts fabricated from downloadable plans, possibly from its 3D archive.

So, are the Swedish pirates serious, or is this just publicity stunt intended to worry Big Media? Probably a bit of both. For years the team has been looking at different ways to evade legal controls, and it set up a short-lived collection to buy the so-called Kingdom of Sealand – a collection of anti-aircraft stations rotting off the Suffolk coast. Since then it has relied on mirror sites to keep the service going.

But drones are a very different matter. Although software-assisted flight control in rough weather is getting better, all of the really good stuff is military-grade. Drones are becoming more capable, but they have very limited flight time – and you'd need a lot of them, all ready to take to the skies if the RIAA comes knocking.

El Reg recommends a good dose of skepticism until further information is released – if it ever is. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned
Swedish court rules there's 'great risk' WikiLeaker will dodge prosecution
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
NSA mass spying reform KILLED by US Senators
Democrats needed just TWO more votes to keep alive bill reining in some surveillance
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
The total economic impact of Druva inSync
Examining the ROI enterprises may realize by implementing inSync, as they look to improve backup and recovery of endpoint data in a cost-effective manner.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.