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Hands on with Kinect Star Wars

Forced to exhaustion

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Princess Leia faces her knockers

Next up, there's an even more exasperating mode, "Rancor Rampage", which sees players take control of a giant beast asked to complete tasks, such as throw people a certain distance, crush droids, or simply cause as much damage as possible. On paper that doesn't sound so bad, but in practice it was just as unresponsive and random as the other modes. Yawn.

Rancor Rampage and Galactic Dance-off modes

Those that enjoy games like Dance Central will no doubt lap up the "Galactic Dance-Off" mode, which as previously reported, sees Princess Leia boogie about in skimpy clothes. This was just a distraction, if I'm honest, but either way, I'm not a fan of these kinds of games. On the plus side, there are 15 popular modern tracks to choose from, each given a Star Wars twist. That was probably the highlight of the entire game for me.

Finally, there's a mode where you get to do what every Star Wars fan wants: fight to the death with Darth Vader. Gamers are given the chance to attack and generally beat the Sith out of the dark knight of the Dark Side. Not much cop if I'm honest, but I was playing an unfinished version. Maybe the completed code will be better.

Kinect Star Wars

The chokes on you

It was a fun afternoon out of the office, but after arriving back with aching limbs and sweaty armpits, I did question if the game was worth the exhaustion.

I'm a huge fan of Kinect, but unfortunately there are far too many games that don't cut the mustard. This Star Wars effort seems to be another. I'm hoping that the final build will be rather more enjoyable than this pre-release version proved to be. It's set to hit shop shelves on 3 April.

If my hands-on experience was anything to go by, you'll have to Force me to play it again when it gets launched. And that's a real shame, because I've been looking forward to Kinect Star Wars for a long time, and so have many other fans of Kinect and of Star Wars.

Kinect Star Wars

Nothing quite like the real thing

Guess I'll have to stick to waving imaginary lightsabres around in front of the mirror after all. ®

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