Feeds

Microsoft accused of leaking RDP attack code

Epic security fail

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

The newly-found attack code that exploits critical flaws in Microsoft's RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol) system appears to have been leaked by Microsoft or one of its partners, says the researcher who originally discovered it.

Luigi Auriemma, an Italian security researcher who originally reported the flaw to Microsoft, has examined the attack code and says parts of it are the same as the sample that he sent in for analysis, and contains code that he wrote to show the proof of concept. He said additional information he has received makes it likely the code was leaked from the Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP).

"If the author of the leak is a Microsoft employee... bad for him," he writes. "If the author of the leak is one of the MAPP partners... it's the epic fail of the whole system, what do you expect if you give the proof of concept to your 'super trusted' partners?"

The MAPP system was set up by Microsoft to share information with trusted partners in the software industry, primarily in the security field. It's one of a number of initiatives that Microsoft is making to try to improve its threat posture to attacks, but it appears that leaky partners may have had the opposite effect.

"Microsoft is actively investigating the disclosure of shared MAPP vulnerability details and will take the necessary actions to protect customers," Yunsun Wee, director of Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing Group told El Reg in an emailed statement. "Given that a proof-of-concept code is publically available, we recommend customers apply the security update as soon as possible to be protected."

In a blog post, Wee confirmed that the attack code found in the wild does appear to be the same as that submitted by Auriemma, and said that Microsoft was taking steps to "ensure that confidential information we share is protected pursuant to our contracts," – or to put it another way, server logs are now being pored through to find the culprit. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
Israel's Iron Dome missile tech stolen by Chinese hackers
Corporate raiders Comment Crew fingered for attacks
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
Four fake Google haxbots hit YOUR WEBSITE every day
Goog the perfect ruse to slip into SEO orfice
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.